Additional Facts
6. Changes in atmospheric CO2 FOLLOW temperature changes.

This fact came as a shock to most scientists and climate laymen.  It was first revealed in a very careful ice core analysis by Hubertus Fischer, et. al., in Science magazine in 1999.  Since then, other scientists from around the world studying multiple ice cores have corroborated Fischer's finding.  They have found that the average lag of CO2 change is about 800 years, apparently long enough for the oceans to begin warming sufficiently to cause a net release of CO2 into the atmosphere or, on the other hand, to cool it enough if temperatures are falling, to begin to have a net absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere.  This lag interval varies from 200 years to 1,600 years or more.  Unfortunately, many, many scientists, politicians and the media took very firm positions that CO2 was causing climate change and many of them, including the media, have struggled mightily to rationalize the obvious implication of Fischer's observations.  Billions and billions of dollars have been funneled into studies in the hopes of finding something that might counter this revelation.  However, the additional research and empirical observations continue to indicate that CO2's role in global warming or in global climate change has been vastly overestimated.  For a more recent ice core analysis, see below.

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